Baffin and Torngat Mountains

From EcoInfo Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Source: North American Terrestrial Ecoregions - Level III, Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 393, rue St-Jacques ouest, Bureau 200, Montreal, Canada H2Y 1N9, May 2011

Baffin and Torngat Mountains Needs map


This ecoregion extends from Bylot Island in Nunavut southwards along the eastern margins of Baffin Island and into northern Labrador.

Climate

A humid, extremely cold climate marked by very short, cold summers and long cold winters characterize the climatic conditions here. From north to south generally, the mean annual temperatures are approximately -6 to -11.5°C; the mean summer temperatures are 1 to 4 °C; the mean winter temperature are -16.5 to -23°C; and average annual precipitation amounts to 200–400 to 400–700 mm, with the higher values occurring in the high central elevations.

Terrain

Multiple-tonguing glaciers and some icecaps mask the elevated reaches of the Baffin and Torngat mountains. Peaks attain 1,525–2,135 m. Long fjord inlets with deep and steep-sided U-shaped valleys commonly incise the eastern margins of this region where they abut the coastal zones of Baffin Bay. Deep, continuous permafrost with low ice content prevails. Bare bedrock and discontinuous mantles of colluvial, alluvial, and morainal materials are typical in lower elevations. Turbic Cryosols are associated with upland patterned ground and boulder fields and some Organic Cryosols occur on wetter valley lowlands.

Soil

Bare bedrock and discontinuous mantles of colluvial, alluvial, and morainal materials are typical in lower elevations. Turbic Cryosols are associated with upland patterned ground and boulder fields and some Organic Cryosols occur on wetter valley lowlands.

Hydrology

Most of the drainage is of low to moderate density and flows largely eastwards into the inlets, fjords and ocean waters of Baffin Bay. Streams and rivers show marked flows in the brief summer periods.

Geology

Vegetation

Discontinuous groundcover of mosses, lichens, and cold-hardy vascular plants, such as sedge and cottongrass, dominate northern areas and to the south grade increasingly into patches of low-lying and dwarf forms of arctic deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Terrain in the lower elevations and sheltered/south-facing valleys shows the greatest amounts of vegetative cover but this is largely sporadic in distribution, although it becomes more continuous in lower latitudes and in wetlands.  

Wildlife

While habitats are not overly productive in most cases, species present include arctic hare, arctic fox, lemming, caribou and polar bear in coastal areas. Birds can include king eider, rock ptarmigan, northern fulmar, plover, hoary redpoll, and snow bunting.

Lichens Species List

Ecosystems

References

Source: North American Terrestrial Ecoregions - Level III, Commision for Environmental Cooperation, 393, rue St-Jacques ouest, Bureau 200, Montreal, Canada H2Y 1N9, May 2011